fastcompany:

See What I See — African Teenagers Take Their Own Photos To Capture A Different View Of Their Home

No focus on war-torn worlds or endangered wildlife here. Just everyday life, from the viewpoint of 18 Gambian teenagers.

Read More>

If you’re reading this…
Congratulations, you’re alive.
If that’s not something to smile about,
then I don’t know what is.

Chad Sugg, Monsters Under Your Head (via observando)

—- I don’t know about this author or about this book, but this quote says it all about being alive.

mothernaturenetwork:

African lake turns animals into statues
Tanzania’s Lake Natron calcifies the animals that die in its waters, and Nick Brandt captures them with eerie photographs.

rowlikeagirl:

The Golden Pavilion at Kinkaku-ji Temple, #Kyoto, #Japan. #nofilter

rowlikeagirl:

The Golden Pavilion at Kinkaku-ji Temple, #Kyoto, #Japan. #nofilter

(Source: comicsodissey)

subtilitas:

Brückner & Brückner - Addition to St. Peter’s church, Wenzenbach 2003. Via, photos (C)  Peter Manev.

coffeenuts:

aurorae:Me. (by Crusade.)

cabbagerose:

Kengo Kuma’s Temples of Light

via: 1-7, 8

airows:

(via 24 Photos That Will Make You Want To Visit Thailand « Airows)
8bitfuture:

Photo: Pac-Man Graffiti.

8bitfuture:

Photo: Pac-Man Graffiti.

medievalpoc:

Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione
Phyrra and Deucalion
Italy (1655)
Oil on canvas, 83 x 107 cm.
Staatliche Museen, Berlin.
From WGA.hu:

The story of a great flood occurs in the mythology of many races. The Greek version (Met. 1:348-415) tells of Deucalion, son of Prometheus, who, like Noah, escaped the destruction that overtook the rest of mankind by building an ark in which he floated for nine days with his wife Pyrrha. After the waters had subsided they were advised by an oracle to veil their heads and ‘throw the bones of your great mother behind you’, which they took to mean the rocks of Mother Earth. They did as they were bid, the rocks which Deucalion threw turning into men and Pyrrha’s into women. Thus a new human race was created.
In the painting Pyrrha and Deucalion are shown in the act of casting the rocks. On the ground rocks change into men and women who scramble to their feet.

[x] [x] [x]

medievalpoc:

Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione

Phyrra and Deucalion

Italy (1655)

Oil on canvas, 83 x 107 cm.

Staatliche Museen, Berlin.

From WGA.hu:

The story of a great flood occurs in the mythology of many races. The Greek version (Met. 1:348-415) tells of Deucalion, son of Prometheus, who, like Noah, escaped the destruction that overtook the rest of mankind by building an ark in which he floated for nine days with his wife Pyrrha. After the waters had subsided they were advised by an oracle to veil their heads and ‘throw the bones of your great mother behind you’, which they took to mean the rocks of Mother Earth. They did as they were bid, the rocks which Deucalion threw turning into men and Pyrrha’s into women. Thus a new human race was created.

In the painting Pyrrha and Deucalion are shown in the act of casting the rocks. On the ground rocks change into men and women who scramble to their feet.

[x] [x] [x]

(via dendroica)

More plans for Google’s smart contact lens revealed

8bitfuture:

image

Google’s plans for a contact lens able to measure glucose levels were first announced in a blog post in January. Now the company is teaming up with major contact lens manufacturer Novartis, in order to bring even more features to the lens.

Read More

(Source: novartis.com)

taphophilia:

Noughts and crosses by Lplatebigcheese on Flickr.